Microsoft Internet Explorer 9 may be… erm… amazing.

Yup, I actually said “amazing”. On the way to work this morning an update from Mashable on Facebook caught my eye. It appears that Microsoft’s new version of Internet Explorer may just surpass everybody’s expectations. I decided to do a little digging myself and found that Microsoft have made a “test drive” facility available for their new Internet Explorer version and the results really do look promising.

InternetExplorer9

Yup, I actually said “amazing”. On the way to work this morning an update from Mashable on Facebook caught my eye. It appears that Microsoft’s new version of Internet Explorer may just surpass everybody’s expectations. I decided to do a little digging myself and found that Microsoft have made a “test drive” facility available for their new Internet Explorer version and the results really do look promising.

Internet Explorer is due for beta release this September.

Here are some metrics that have been released from Microsoft:

IE9 Acid Test

As you can see from the image, IE9 scores an amazing 95/100 as apposed to its previous score of 20/100.

To be honest, I never thought I would see the day that Microsoft would actually pull this off. Over and above all of this, Microsoft is trying its best at complying with requests from thousands of developers for better interoperability between browsers with regards to markup (tags, scripts and language). Microsoft has submitted over 2,100 tests to working groups at the W3C.

Well done Microsoft!

Author: NickDuncan

Nick is the owner of Code Cabin, founder of WP Google Maps, WP Live Chat Support, and Sola Plugins,

7 thoughts on “Microsoft Internet Explorer 9 may be… erm… amazing.”

  1. It’s about blerrie time too! IE has failed time and time again, but has surprising remained popular. Let’s just hope that IE9 will be a web browser that we can all appreciate. Any idea on when they plan to release it?

    1. Hey Galen. They’re actually planning to release a beta version next month. Problem is, it wont work on Windows XP so the majority of South African users still wont be able to experience the new capabilities.

  2. Although the look set to take on the other browsers with support for standards and what not, I am curious to see if they made improvements to their render engine. Pages rendered through IE8 looks like it is displaying a bad photo taken from the webpage.

  3. Thanks for sharing Nick. These early test results and metrics are certainly interesting and impressive.
    However  I find myself wondering to what extent the page rendering and compatibility of a browser influences us when choosing a web browser. Obviously Internet Explorer remains very popular as the “default setting” on Microsoft platforms because many people don’t bother to try anything else. The rest of us who actually choose a browser, can obviously be influenced by many things (and I’m not presuming to know all about this), but my guess is that for most of us simple stuff like the look and feel of a browser for example plays a big role.
    Clearly no-one who knows what they are doing is gonna stick with a browser which is useless in terms of compatibility with modern web standards and has rendering issues etc, but I’d be interested to know what the balance is (or should be) between the technical aspects of browser capability and the interface aspects. What do we attach importance to? You guys know more than I do.
    I have believed Internet Explorer is sub-par for so long that it’s weird to think it’s making a comeback. Up till now the only valid reason I have known for using IE is to test your own sites compatibility with it so that others who use it won’t be too badly impacted.

    1. Hi Jon

      Thanks for taking the time to write such an engaging comment. I appreciate it. You are 100% correct with the fact that most users will use IE purely because its a default of their operating system. Only a handful of those users (the developers/designers) understand that it is in fact, a piece of garbage. However, more and more websites and developers are making use of certain scripts that will tell a user once they land on the site, if his/her browser is outdated and that they are missing out on some functionality. Only a certain percentage of those users will actually act on that information.

      With regards to your comment on the interface aspect of a browser, I would by far go with Google Chrome as it is by far the fastest (initial load and browsing speed) and most user-friendly browser I have used.

      Thanks again

  4. No problem! Thanks for the quick reply.  I agree entirely.
     
    I was a long time user of Firefox and enjoyed it for it’s vast features and extensibility. But it does tend to be a little memory hungry. For a while I used Chrome and Firefox in tandem (partly because it was useful to have different proxies set up in each for accessing the internet from home or at university). But a while back I started using Chrome predominantly and have continued to do so. It is simple and fast, so I have to agree with you.

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